EuroIA linklog special: "Implementing 'Identity' on Guardian.co.uk"

Martin Belam by Martin Belam, 24 September 2010

A special edition of the linklog today. If you were at EuroIA and saw my presentation "Implementing 'Identity' on Guardian.co.uk", then here is a list of links to things I mentioned in the talk. If you weren't there, then this is a taster of what you can expect to see discussed when I publish it.

My inspiration for doing so much sketching has come from meeting and seeing the following people give presentations on the topic:

This is a video of Frances talking at one of our London IA events:

I used the following Creative Commons licensed image in the presentation:

6 Comments

I like the article regarding paid content causing many people to not visit the site. I used to love reading The Times Online, but when they made it available through purchase only, I stopped going. Because some days or months I might visit a ton, then others I won't at all and it's a waste of money. On the other hand, I also believe that news should be paid for. It's a tough one, but I think in the end if ALL the papers do it, then things will return to how they always were which is people paying for their news.

Why, if so many other websites (including big ones such as facebook) can achieve funding through advertising, can newspapers not be funded using this same approach?

@Sarrah Harris – I completely disagree with you. News is one thing that should definitely be free. If news are paid for there is a possibility to make money of it and you could see couple of capitalist owning everything. Then you have to go through them to get your news and they can choose what to print and what not to print. I am from Italy and we have that problem with Berlusconi.

I completely agree with the opinion that news should be free. Because if we are to pay for so basic a need as news of the world, we better shut ourselves up in a room and sit. But then, of course, quality news does have a price, because journalists who go to gather news sometimes risk their lives too, so maybe it is worth a price, a reasonable one, though. And I loved the Huffduffer sign-up page. It's such a fresh approach, I wonder if any other website has one like this. Thanks for letting me know!

I would rather pay more for a newspaper on the days i want one (there is still something nice about sitting on a sunday with a coffee and a paper) to cover the print costs, but I see this as a luxury. I see day to day news as something that I expect to be able to get for free, assuming I access it online.

I appreciate this solution isn't great for people who don't have internet access. Interestingly, I'm starting to use the news feeds of twitter and facebook updates, particularly for instant news when I'm aware something is happening but there is a delay in it getting onto the newspaper sites.

Keep up to date on my new blog